Second son – Isaac

In the second son theme, the second son receives the inheritance that the first son loses. Isaac is literally a second son, and he is a second son by way of riddle. Isaac tells us something about Christ as the second Adam that we did not yet see in Abraham. Isaac is the third ‘second’ in Matthews list of records.

Isaac the literal second son

Ishmael was the first born child of Abram. He was born before Abram became Abraham. A change of name does not make him literally, not a child of Abraham, but Isaac is called the only begotten son of Abraham. [1] Literally, Isaac remained the second son of Abraham. In the role of the second son, he obtained the inheritance that Ishmael literally lost. [2]

Isaac the riddle second son

The keys to teaching (the kingdom of heaven) are the symbols of the cross. For Isaac, the obvious one is when he is placed on the altar as the sacrifice. [3] Prior to that moment he represents the first son who dies desolate. The fact that he didn’t die, is a symbol of his resurrection. After that moment he is he second son who is fruitful [4] and receives the inheritance.

Next: Second son – Jacob

References

  • Heb 11:17 By faith Abraham, when he was tried, offered up Isaac: and he that had received the promises offered up his only begotten [son],
  • Ge 17:21 But my covenant will I establish with Isaac, which Sarah shall bear unto thee at this set time in the next year.
  • Ge 22:9 And they came to the place which God had told him of; and Abraham built an altar there, and laid the wood in order, and bound Isaac his son, and laid him on the altar upon the wood.

Ge 25:26 And after that came his brother out, and his hand took hold on Esau’s heel; and his name was called Jacob: and Isaac [was] threescore years old when she bare them.

 

Second son – Abraham

Abraham was the first instance of the first-son/second-son theme that Matthew saw. The theme says that he first son loses an inheritance and/or is fruitless and is also portrayed as being earthly. The second son is the heavenly son who gains the inheritance and is fruitful.

There are two ways that this theme is played out concerning Abraham. He is literally a second son and he is figuratively a second son.

Abram the literal second son

Genesis appears to give Abraham pre-eminence as the first born in the listing of the sons of Terah. This itself is a riddle, since he is the second son, as the numbers will prove out.

Ge 11:26 And Terah lived seventy years, and begat Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

Terah was 70 years of age when Abram was born

Ge 11:32 And the days of Terah were two hundred and five years: and Terah died in Haran.

Terah died when he was 205.

Ge 12:4 ¶ So Abram departed, as the LORD had spoken unto him; and Lot went with him: and Abram [was] seventy and five years old when he departed out of Haran.

Upon Terah’s death Abram leaves Ur; he was 75, 205-75=130. Terah was 130 years old when Abraham was born, and 70 years when Haran was born.

Many Greek interpreters suggest that Abraham was generous in giving Lot the first pick of land when they separated. [1] Abraham may or may not have been a generous man, but we do not know it from these verses. It was Lot’s birthright, as successor to the firstborn to act on behalf of the firstborn. Lot was the house of Haran. It was was customary and proper for Abraham to defer to him.

Since Lot represents the first son, the expected pattern for the first-son/second-son theme is that he will be earthly rather than spiritual. There are two hints to this: the literal, and a riddle.

Literally, Lot chose the land that was green and pleasing to the eye [2] Lot exhibits signs of the lust of the eyes.

Consider the riddle which uses other symbols. Abraham introduces the left and right hand imagery, though we don’t have any reason to believe that he understood it. He suggests that one go left and one go right. [3] Recall how Jesus uses the left and the right with the goats and the sheep. [4]

Did Lot go right or left? Is there sufficient information for us to know? It tells us that Abram had been traveling South [5] and then Lot went East. [6] He made a left turn. He chose the path of the goat/flesh.

Abraham the riddle second son

Abraham is also a second son by way of riddle. He was born as Abram. [7] He was “born again” as Abraham. [8]

Abram “died” desolate. He did not receive the promised child (Isaac). The child of promise came to Abraham. When Ishamel was born, he was born to Abram not to Abraham. [9] Just so there is no misunderstanding about the desolation of Abram, Paul, in writing to the Hebrews confirms our method of interpretation. He calls Isaac, Abraham’s only-begotten son. Though Abraham had many more sons, the only one that counts as a son of Abraham is Isaac because he is the child of promise. [10]

References

  • Ge 13:9 [Is] not the whole land before thee? separate thyself, I pray thee, from me: if [thou wilt take] the left hand, then I will go to the right; or if [thou depart] to the right hand, then I will go to the left.
  • Ge 13:10 ¶ And Lot lifted up his eyes, and beheld all the plain of Jordan, that it [was] well watered every where, before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah, [even] as the garden of the LORD, like the land of Egypt, as thou comest unto Zoar.
  • Ge 13:9 [Is] not the whole land before thee? separate thyself, I pray thee, from me: if [thou wilt take] the left hand, then I will go to the right; or if [thou depart] to the right hand, then I will go to the left.
  • Mt 25:33 And he shall set the sheep on his right hand, but the goats on the left.
  • Ge 13:3 And he went on his journeys from the south even to Bethel, unto the place where his tent had been at the beginning, between Bethel and Hai;
  • Ge 13:11 Then Lot chose him all the plain of Jordan; and Lot journeyed east: and they separated themselves the one from the other.
  • Ge 11:26 And Terah lived seventy years, and begat Abram, Nahor, and Haran.
  • Ge 17:5 Neither shall thy name any more be called Abram, but thy name shall be Abraham; for a father of many nations have I made thee.
  • Ge 16:15 ¶ And Hagar bare Abram a son: and Abram called his son’s name, which Hagar bare, Ishmael.

Heb 11:17 By faith Abraham, when he was tried, offered up Isaac: and he that had received the promises offered up his only begotten [son],

 

The book of the son of David

Mt 1:1 ¶ The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham.

Matthew had several years to study the scriptures after Mark wrote his gospel. He included material not covered by Mark because he saw that the life of Jesus fulfilled scripture and he included enough information to show the hermeneutic tool he used to gain his insights.

Compare the verse above with :

Ec 1:1 ¶ The words of the Preacher, the son of David, king in Jerusalem.

Both Ecclesiastes and Matthew are the books of the son of David. Ecclesiastes speaks of the kingdom of the earth and concludes that it is all vanity. Matthew talks about the kingdom of heaven.

The Hebrew preacher is one who spoke publicly to gatherings. After Matthew takes care of some prophetic riddles he will portray Jesus as the preacher with the sermon on the mount.

In addition to these interesting observations, the two books play into the first-son, second-son theme. This is where the second son obtains the inheritance or promise where the first son loses it. The second book of the son of David show Jesus as the king, the second book of the son of David.

The word generation in Hebrew is toledoth. It is more properly interpreted as “the record belong to or written by”. Mt 1:1 can be read “The book of the record of Jesus Christ…”. Now rather than read the list of names as a genealogy, Matthew points back to the OT record of these men and calls attention to the first/second son theme.

He specifically declares that the book is the record of Jesus. Matthew particularly calls attention to the book of the son of David, even though he wants to start with Abraham. Why? Because it is required to solve the riddle. He will later say that there are 42 ‘records’ (genreations/toledoth) of Jesus, but he will have only listed 41… unless you count the book of Matthew itself as the missing record.

Mark’s beginning

Mark quoted scripture “Behold, I send my messenger before thy face, which shall prepare thy way before thee.”

Isa 40:3 ¶ The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the LORD, make straight in the desert a highway for our God.
Isa 57:14 And shall say, Cast ye up, cast ye up, prepare the way, take up the stumblingblock out of the way of my people.
Mal 3:1 ¶ Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me: and the Lord, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger of the covenant, whom ye delight in: behold, he shall come, saith the LORD of hosts.

The first thing you notice is that Marks quote doesn’t look much like a direct quote. Get over it. Standards for quoting, avoiding plagiarism, etc. simply did not exist. Even Jesus paraphrased scripture rather than directly quote it. God’s word does not return void. Every translation of scripture is a paraphrase. If you understand scripture, share it. Don’t let your inability to quote the English paraphrase word for word stop you.

But, the differences are not attributable to simple casual use. Jesus taught his disciples that all the scriptures spoke of him. [1] [2]Each one of the prophecies speaks of Christ.

John is the messenger who prepares the way. He comes before “the Lord”, “our God”, “my people (Israel)”, and “me”. Each is a reference to Christ. Mark has identified each prophecy as speaking of Christ. He summarizes them all and addressed them to Christ in “thy face”.

Mark had declared Jesus to be the Lord and God. He has equated Israel, which was called the son of God, with the Son of God. And he has Identified him as both the speaker and the subject of the prophecy of Malachi.

The first lesson in hermeneutics is that all scripture speaks of Christ. They are Christocentric.

References

 

  • Joh 5:39 Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me.

Lu 24:27 And beginning at Moses and all the prophets, he expounded unto them in all the scriptures the things concerning himself.

 

The gospel gaps

First the gaps between the beginnings of each gospel will be examined. Beginning with Mark, the additional material from Matthew, then Luke, then John will be examined to see the tools they used as they studied the scriptures. Their hermeneutic will become evident from the Old Testament text using the tools that we mentioned previously.

NT authors saw history as prophecy
NT authors point to OT patterns
NT authors play with riddles
NT authors read meaning from Hebrew letters

Mark began his gospel with the preaching of John the Baptist and relates it to the prophecy of Isaiah. [1] And his costume and behavior was intended to elicit thoughts of Elijah. [2] The tools Mark used will be identified.

Matthew begins with a reference to Abraham. [3] Between Abraham and Isaiah and Elijah, there is a lot of history. The mystery in the history that Mark missed will be examined, as well as the tools which make them known.

Luke begins his story with Adam, even though his gospel has some introductory remarks. The material he includes between Adam and Abraham will be examined for the mystery and the tools which reveal it.

John starts his gospel off using Ge 1:1. The material included from creation to Adam will be examined to demonstrate his mastery of the mystery. John introduces many doctrinal novelties when compared to previous authors: The Logos, Light, Bread, Door, etc. He had access to tools that the previous authors did not. But he had many more years, and many of those in isolation, to study the mystery in depth.

References

 

  • Isa 40:3 ¶ The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the LORD, make straight in the desert a highway for our God. Isa 40:4 Every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low: and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough places plain:
  • Mr 1:6 And John was clothed with camel’s hair, and with a girdle of a skin about his loins; and he did eat locusts and wild honey;

Mt 1:1 ¶ The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham.

 

The ‘Q’ document

Many Biblical scholars look for subtle ways to discredit the Bible. Such is the invention of the ‘Q’ document. It is an imaginary document said to predate Matthew and Luke, from which Matthew and Luke drew their material. They theoretically used it to embellish the Book of Mark to produce their own books.

Consider the ramifications if that were true. It would mean that there was a source which was more authoritative than Matthew and Luke which has been lost. The reason given that no one mentions it is that it was confusing, and Matthew and Luke had to make it’s teachings more understandable.

The claim then is that God inspired a work which no one could understand and so the Greeks had to interpret God to man in a way he could understand. Furthermore, it implies that many jots and tittles from Gods word were lost. [1]

The reason scholars need to believe in mythical scriptures is because they do not understand where Matthew and Luke (and John), many years later, got the material that wasn’t available to Mark.

The answer is plain. The mystery which was hidden from the beginning was revealed through Christ and the cross. The apostles did not get magic knowledge, or a tiny taste of omniscience, but they studied the scriptures in the context of the resurrection, to understand the mystery. The more they studied, the more they understood. [2] The more they studied, the more the Holy Spirit brought things to remembrance that they had been taught [3] and so the more they shared.

As mentioned earlier:

Mark wrote that the story began with the preaching of John the Baptist. [4] Later, with more time to study, they saw the prophetic riddles extending back to Abraham. Matthew begins his gospel there.[5] With more time, Luke was able to push the beginning of the story back to Adam. [6] And with the most time, and isolation on a prison island, John was able to push the start of the story all the way back to the first words of Genesis. [7]
The differences in how stories are told between the gospel authors tell us how much more they could understand the prophetic riddles of the Old Testament. They were able to correlate even more details concerning the life of Christ with the prophetic riddles. Some details did not need repeated since they were well known from previous teachings.

It is a simple thing to scoff at the myth of the Q-document. It is another to actually produce the additional information from the Old Testament by studying it the way that Jesus taught them to. By studying the ‘new’ material from one gospel to the next, and examining how subjects handled in both are treated differently, we can discern the proficiency with which they could handle the mystery at that snapshot in time. Evidence can be shown they could use the same tools more proficiently, and that they discovered new tools with time.

References

 

  • Mt 5:18 For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled.
  • 2Ti 2:15 Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth.
  • Joh 14:26 But the Comforter, [which is] the Holy Ghost, whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your remembrance, whatsoever I have said unto you.
  • Mr 1:1 ¶ The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God; Mr 1:2 As it is written in the prophets, Behold, I send my messenger before thy face, which shall prepare thy way before thee.
  • Mt 1:1 ¶ The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham.
  • Lu 3:38 Which was [the son] of Enos, which was [the son] of Seth, which was [the son] of Adam, which was [the son] of God.

Joh 1:1 ¶ In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

 

He completed his work ת

As the last letter of the alphabet, the tav ת represents the finished work of God. His revelation ר has finished its work with a spontaneous return to him. We love him because he first loved us. [1]

The name of the tav means ‘mark’. The mark of God is his finished work in us. [2]

The word for fraud tk תך and the word for flawless tam תם are an interesting contrast. The first is the finished work ת of the Son of God in death ך. It is fraudulent to consider Christ as dead. This is the same teaching as Sibboleth. The second is the finished work ת by the Son obtaining his bride in the flesh, fulfilling the promise of the Father ם.

As a suffix, the tav ת makes the preceding a subject. It amplifies the meaning of a single letter and makes larger collections a subject.

The bet ב means a revelation to man. Then name bet בת means daughter. Since the female represents the blind, or those who do not understand, the tav changes the focus of the metaphor to the one receiving the revelation; the one who needs to see and understand, the daughter.

The winepress gath גת is the object which produces the tribulation of the fruit of the vine. The tav focuses the attention of the gimel ג, meaning to pursue, on the object by which Christ pursued man, his tribulation, even to death.

The word muth מתmeaning ‘died’, has the mem as a prefix meaning from, and the tav at the end, meaning the end. We get a hint that death is from the end.

The word eth עת meaning ‘era’ amplifies the flesh, or suggests the end of flesh. This in in contrast to eth את which suggests eternity by the representation of the first letter and the last; the beginning and the end. This supports other suggestions that time is an illusion of the flesh in order to measure decay caused by sin. The time of time is an era. The time of flesh is an era.

There is a non-Biblical, but contemporary saying which includes a supposed saying of Jesus. Whether Jesus said it or not is not important. It illustrates an understanding of the same method of building words from the metaphor of the letters. Part of it is: “And when he finds, he will be dismayed.” The word for ‘dismayed’ is chath חת. The chet ח represents understanding. When one understands, he has found what he didn’t understand. The tav focuses on the result of understanding, which is dismay. This does not speak of normal understanding, but of understanding the thing which was not understood and which separated him from God. When men understand that God alone is God, it causes a dismay or dread, realizing the deep trouble they have caused for themselves as they stand before the Almighty.

References

  • 1Jo 4:19 We love him, because he first loved us.

Php 1:6 Being confident of this very thing, that he which hath begun a good work in you will perform [it] until the day of Jesus Christ:

 

His word does not return void ש

The shin ש is drawn with a vav descending down the right side (God speaking into the void) and two zayins ז returning. God’s word does not return void, but brings back an increase. [1]

John recognizes it as the Spirit in the word for heaven shamayim שמים. [2] It is likely he obtained this from the formation of the word ‘heavens’ in Ge 1:2 where the Spirit ש moved on the face of the waters ‘mayim’ מים.

As a metaphor it can be expressed as a marriage (the increase), as in the name Yeshua (Jesus) which is Yahweh with a marriage ש in his heart, fulfilling the prophecy of “God with us”.

Tradition now says that it can be pronounced as a ‘sh’ or a ‘s’. The word shibboleth means an ear of corn, or stream. If it is pronounced as a ‘s’ it sounds like Sibboleth, which means a single grain. The difference is the difference between life and death. [3] It is a question of what do you say of Christ, who is he? Is he the single corn that died, or is he the ear of corn which is fruitful in resurrection?

Why would such a tradition arise? Could it be that men who did not want to proclaim Christ as the Messiah choose to say Sibboleth?

The word ‘name’ meaning reputation is shem שם. God’s reputation is based on him completing ם (obtaining a people) the fruitfulness of his word ש.

One of the primary metaphors of the aleph was separation. ‘Lift up’ sa שא is what happens to the bride as she is raptured and separated from the earth.

The gift ‘shay’ שי to the bride ש is a new life י.

References

  • Isa 55:11 So shall my word be that goeth forth out of my mouth: it shall not return unto me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please, and it shall prosper [in the thing] whereto I sent it.
  • 1Jo 5:7 For there are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one.

Jud 12:6 Then said they unto him, Say now Shibboleth: and he said Sibboleth: for he could not frame to pronounce [it] right. Then they took him, and slew him at the passages of Jordan: and there fell at that time of the Ephraimites forty and two thousand.

 

Revealing ר

The rosh ר symbolizes revelation beyond mere commands, law or words. It contains personality. In the bet ב, the revelation is to man. In the kaf כ, the revelation has become man. And in the tav ת, the revelation has produced a spontaneous response back to God. The name of the letter means ‘destitute’. Christ who is the revelation of the Father, emptied himself to be found in the form of man. [1]

When Christ had finished his work ם of revelation ר he was exalted ram רם.

The revelation of God ר came quickly retz רץ through the cross ץ. [2]

When the revelation רב has come to man ב, he contends for the faith rab רב.

The word for descend rad רד contains a hint of the emptying or kenosis of Christ as he became incarnate. It is important to note that he did not become lessor than God in the kenosis, he merely chose not to use the attributes of deity, as mentioned previously.

The word of God in the flesh is the word for evil. Christ was made to be sin for us. [3]

The revelation ר of the bride ז is something that was kept secret ‘raz’ רז until the cross.

As the ‘bar’ בר, he is the exact representation of the nature of God.

The mountain ‘har’ is where you go when you are drawn ה to the revelation ר.

One who pursues ג the revelation ר is a sojourner ‘ger’ גר.

The bitterness ‘myrrh’ מר of his death comes from מ the revelation ר.

The Son of Man נ revealed ר that he was the light of the world [4], and as the Word of God was a lamp ‘ner’ נר to our feet. [5] This means that Jesus is our holiness/light and he directs our lives.

John uses the rosh as “water/word” in “earth” ארץ.

References

  • Php 2:7 But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men:
  • Isa 58:8 ¶ Then shall thy light break forth as the morning, and thine health shall spring forth speedily: and thy righteousness shall go before thee; the glory of the LORD shall be thy reward.
  • 2Co 5:21 For he hath made him [to be] sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.
  • Joh 9:5 As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.

Ps 119:105 ¶ NUN. Thy word [is] a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path.

1Jo 5:8 And there are three that bear witness in earth, the Spirit, and the water, and the blood: and these three agree in one.

The Son of God died and rose ק

The qof ק is drawn as a kaf כ with the tail going to the grave, and then springing to life again to return to heaven. The two aspects of the metaphor is the death and the resurrection of the Son of God. The name of the letter means encompass or surround. This is another way of saying that we are in him. [1]

It should be no surprise that “he arose” is the word kuwm קם, or he finished the work in the flesh ם by dying and rising again ק.

The “end” qetz קץ is another way of saying “It is finished” [2]  It is the death ץ during the death and resurrection of the Son of God ק. This word means “the end (of time)”.

The word for “glowing embers” is qed קֵד; meaning the law ד after the resurrection קֵ. Who can live by the law after the resurrection?

Isa 33:14 The sinners in Zion are afraid; fearfulness hath surprised the hypocrites. Who among us shall dwell with the devouring fire? who among us shall dwell with everlasting burnings? קֵד.

No one, for the law kills:

2Co 3:6 ¶ Who also hath made us able ministers of the new testament; not of the letter, but of the spirit: for the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life.

The voice qal קל is the teaching ל of the death and resurrection ק.

And after the death and resurrection ק, if you understand ח, he “takes you” qech קח.

References

  • Ac 17:28 For in him we live, and move, and have our being; as certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring.

Joh 19:30 When Jesus therefore had received the vinegar, he said, It is finished: and he bowed his head, and gave up the ghost.